All posts by Leslie Tate

ILLUSTRATING THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF CHILDREN’S BOOKS

Hannah Marks

I asked Hannah Marks, who works as a children’s book illustrator, what has inspired her own, very distinctive style. Hannah is a graphic designer currently living in the Hertfordshire countryside just north of London.

Leslie: How did your interest in illustrating children’s books begin? Continue reading ILLUSTRATING THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF CHILDREN’S BOOKS

WRESTLING WITH MY ANGEL by Leslie Tate

Vision After the Sermon: Jacob Wrestling with the Angel by Paul Gauguin

I grew up in the Fifties wanting to be a spiritual child. I didn’t see grand visions or hear strange voices and my world was small, measured by school times and mealtimes and trips to see the family. But in private spots and in places I visited there was a pictorial quality, a sense of something extra, an additional factor that filtered in, making for significance. It was visible but elusive, an edge to experience unnoticed by anyone else, like a signal from a distance that doesn’t transmit and yet somehow registers. I was witness to impressions that couldn’t be named. Continue reading WRESTLING WITH MY ANGEL by Leslie Tate

AN INDIE PUBLISHER’S STORY

I interviewed Anne Samson, co-director of TSL, a publisher going beyond the traditional publishing model and working very closely with its authors. Anne says about TSL: “We’re somewhere between traditional publishing and self-publishing – indie/independent doesn’t quite fit although that is where we broadly sit.”

Leslie: So, can you describe TSL – who and what it publishes and why? Continue reading AN INDIE PUBLISHER’S STORY

THE WORDS WE USE, SPEAKING ABOUT REFUGEES

Harriet Levin Millan

Prize-winning poet, Harriet Levin Millan writes about what she has learned from listening to the stories of refugees, and how she has turned that experience into literature.

How Fast Can You Run, Harriet’s debut novel, based on the experiences of Michael Majok Kuch from South Sudan, has been selected as a Charter for Compassion Global Read and as a Forward Indies Best Book of the Year finalist in three categories. Harriet is also the author of two books of poetry, with a third to appear in 2018. Among her prizes are the Barnard New Women Poets Prize and the Poetry Society of America’s Alice Fay di Castagnola Award. She holds an MFA from the University of Iowa and directs the Certificate Program in Writing and Publishing at Drexel University. Continue reading THE WORDS WE USE, SPEAKING ABOUT REFUGEES

DAWN FINCH – ADDING A PEBBLE TO THE MOUNTAIN

Dawn Finch’s favourite standing stone: the Craw Stone near Rhynie. It shows a salmon leaping a porpoise.

I interviewed Dawn Finch, librarian, activist, novelist and historical researcher about her amazing range of cultural interests. Dawn is the past president of the leading UK professional body for librarians CILIP and writes novels for young adults as well as books about ancient history.

Leslie: Your profile says you have a ‘lifetime fascination with antiquarian books, history and the Gothic’. Can you describe your relationship to books as a child and how that has led to your writing today? Continue reading DAWN FINCH – ADDING A PEBBLE TO THE MOUNTAIN

THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Poppy and Daisy by Alicja O’Sullivan

I asked Alicja O’Sullivan, whose photographs have been exhibited in several major cities and in Italian Vogue, about what inspires her.  Alicja writes:

‘Photography has been my passion since I remember, although I started professionally quite late. I am from Poland, which was at that time a quite rigorously restricted country…. When I was about 12-13 years old I wanted to join our school photography club, but was laughed at by my teacher and was told to forget it as photography is not for girls. Continue reading THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY

A NOTE FROM MEXICO SOUTH BY MARK STATMAN

Mark Statman

In this guest blog, international poet and translator Mark Statman describes his move from the USA to Mexico and his feelings about President Trump’s election. As former associate professor of Literary Studies at Eugene Lang College,  Mark Statman’s translations include Federico García Lorca‘s Poet in New YorkJosé María Hinojosa’s poetry and a forthcoming collection, Never Made in America: Selected Poems from Martín Barea Mattos, out in April. Mark’s own original poetry collections include A Map of the Winds and That Train Again.

Mark writes: Continue reading A NOTE FROM MEXICO SOUTH BY MARK STATMAN

WAR POETRY – A WOMAN’S VOICE

Jo Young

Jo Young is a modern war poet, shortlisted for the Flambard Poetry Prize, currently researching the subject for a PhD. I asked her about her writing and her views on war as a woman and an army reservist.

Leslie: Can you describe in a nutshell the types of writing you’re involved in and enjoy, please? Continue reading WAR POETRY – A WOMAN’S VOICE